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discover the nlt

Read FAQs, your favorite verses, preview the NLT bibles, and learn about the scholars.

discover the nlt
FAQs

Do you have questions about the NLT? Have a look at the list of FAQs that
addresses some of the most common questions.

 What method did the translators use in making the NLT?
 Can you give some examples of the interplay between formal equivalence
 and dynamic equivalence?
 What are the major improvements in the second edition of the NLT?
 Who are the translators of the NLT?
 What texts did the NLT translators use in their translation work?
 How does the NLT compare to the NIV?
 Why do many scholars say that the NLT and most modern translations are
 more accurate than the King James Version?
 What are some of the differences between the KJV and most modern
 translations?
 Is the NLT considered a good translation for serious study?
 What is included in the footnotes of the NLT?
 Will NLT commentaries and other study tools be available to Bible students
 choosing to study the NLT?
 How does the NLT deal with gender language?
 What Bible software programs feature the NLT?
 Can I read the NLT on the Internet?
 Will Tyndale publish a children's version of the NLT like Zondervan did when
 they published the children's version of the NIV called the NIrV?
 What makes the New Living Translation good for use from the pulpit?
 How do the sales of NLT Bibles benefit Bible translation and distribution work
 in languages other than English?
 How does the NLT compare to other modern English translations?
 Why are some verses that appear in the King James Version missing from the text of the New Living Translation and other modern translations?
 My NLT has copyright dates of 1996, 2004, and 2015. What are the differences between these editions?

One challenge the translators faced was in determining how to translate accurately the ancient biblical text that was originally written in a context where male-oriented terms were used to refer to humanity generally. They needed to respect the nature of the ancient context while also trying to make the translation clear to a modern audience that tends to read male-oriented language as applying only to males. Often the original text, though using masculine nouns and pronouns, clearly intends that the message be applied to both men and women. One example is found in the New Testament epistles, where the believers are often called "brothers" (adelphoi). Yet it is clear that these epistles were addressed to all the believers--male and female. In such contexts the NLT translates this Greek word "brothers and sisters" in order to represent the historical situation more accurately. The NLT is also sensitive to passages where the text applies generally to human beings or to the human condition. In many instances the NLT uses plural pronouns (they, them) in place of the masculine singular (he, him).

It should be emphasized that all masculine nouns and pronouns used to represent God (for example, "Father") have been maintained without exception. The translators believe that essential traits of God's revealed character can be conveyed only through the masculine language expressed in the original texts of Scripture.

endorsements

“The second edition is fresh, dynamic and exciting to read. Whether a person is a new believer or a long-time follower, this translation will be a wonderful tool God’s Spirit will use to produce a harvest of kingdom fruit.”

Dr. Roger D. Haber
Central Baptist Church
Middleborough, Massachusetts

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